What Do Tire Builders Do

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Salary, Job Description, How To Become One, and Quiz



Tire Builders

Tire Builders operate machines to build tires.

Salary: $45980
Education: No degree required
Job Satisfaction: Low
Personality: The Builder

What they do

Tire Builders operate machines to build tires.

  • Start rollers that bond tread and plies as drums revolve.
  • Activate bead setters that press prefabricated beads onto plies.
  • Inspect worn tires for faults, cracks, cuts, and nail holes, and determine if tires are suitable for retreading.
  • Cut plies at splice points, and press ends together to form continuous bands.

Typical day

On a daily basis, Tire Builders cut plies at splice points, and press ends together to form continuous bands. They activate bead setters that press prefabricated beads onto plies.

A typical day for a Tire Builder will also include:

  • Roll camelbacks onto casings by hand, and cut camelbacks, using knives.
  • Start rollers that bond tread and plies as drums revolve.
  • Depress pedals to rotate drums, and wind specified numbers of plies around drums to form tire bodies.
  • Align treads with guides, start drums to wind treads onto plies, and slice ends.
  • Rub cement sticks on drum edges to provide adhesive surfaces for plies.

Other responsibilities

Besides their typical day, Tire Builders also brush or spray solvents onto plies to ensure adhesion, and repeat the process as specified, alternating direction of each ply to strengthen tires. They may also fill cuts and holes in tires, using hot rubber.

On a weekly to monthly basis, Tire Builders depress pedals to collapse drums after processing is complete. They might also roll hand rollers over rebuilt casings, exerting pressure to ensure adhesion between camelbacks and casings.

In addition, they rub cement sticks on drum edges to provide adhesive surfaces for plies.

Although specific duties may vary, many of them position rollers that turn ply edges under and over beads or use steel rods to turn ply edges.

To some Tire Builders, it is also their responsibility to fit inner tubes and final layers of rubber onto tires.

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What is the job like

Job satisfaction
Low
Is this job meaningful
Low

61% said they were satisfied with their job and 46% said they found their job meaningful.

Pros

Suitable for people who like practical and hands-on work.

Suitable for people who want to work in a supportive work environment.

This career is perfect for people who love to work indoors.

It is easy to get into this career. Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required for this career.

Cons

Not suitable for people who like to help and teach others.

Salary is below average.

Demand for this career is declining.


Salary

Average salary
$45980 per year
Average hourly wage
$22 per hour

Entry-level Tire Builders with little to no experience can expect to make anywhere between $29,860 to $36,100 per year or $14 to $17 per hour.

Salary range Hourly Annual
Highest (Top 10%) $30 $63,030
Senior (Top 25%) $27 $57,070
Middle (Mid 50%) $22 $46,270
Junior (Bottom 25%) $17 $36,100
No experience (Bottom 10%) $14 $29,860

How to become one

Should you become one

Best personality for this career
The Builder

You can read more about these career personality types here.

People with this personality type likes practical and hands-on work. They prefer working with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery.

People who are suitable for this job tend to like work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They like working with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery.

They also like following set procedures and routines. They like working with data and details more than with ideas.

Take this quiz to see if this is the right career for you.


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