What Does A Floor Layer Do (including Their Typical Day at Work)

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Floor Layers

Floor Layers apply blocks, strips, or sheets of shock-absorbing, sound-deadening, or decorative coverings to floors.

Salary
$49740
Becoming One
Easy
Education
No degree required
Job Satisfaction
Low
Job Growth

Personality





Find a job you love and you will never work a day in your life.Confucius

What they do

Floor Layers apply blocks, strips, or sheets of shock-absorbing, sound-deadening, or decorative coverings to floors.

  • Sweep, scrape, sand, or chip dirt and irregularities to clean base surfaces, correcting imperfections that may show through the covering.
  • Cut flooring material to fit around obstructions.
  • Inspect the surface to be covered to ensure that it is firm and dry.
  • Trim excess covering materials, tack edges and join sections of covering material to form a tight joint.

Typical day

On a daily basis, Floor Layers inspect the surface to be covered to ensure that it is firm and dry. They trim excess covering materials, tack edges, and join sections of covering material to form a tight joint.

A typical day for a Floor Layer will also include:

  • Sweep, scrape, sand, or chip dirt and irregularities to clean base surfaces, correcting imperfections that may show through the covering.
  • Form a smooth foundation by stapling plywood or Masonite over the floor or by brushing waterproof compound onto the surface and filling cracks with plaster, putty, or grout to seal pores.
  • Determine traffic areas and decide the location of seams.
  • Cut flooring material to fit around obstructions.
  • Measure and mark guidelines on surfaces or foundations, using chalk lines and dividers.

Other responsibilities

Besides their typical day, Floor Layers also remove excess cement to clean the finished surface. They may also measure and mark guidelines on surfaces or foundations, using chalk lines and dividers.

On a weekly to monthly basis, Floor Layers disconnect and remove appliances, light fixtures, and worn floor and wall covering from floors, walls, and cabinets. They might also form a smooth foundation by stapling plywood or Masonite over the floor or by brushing waterproof compound onto the surface and filling cracks with plaster, putty, or grout to seal pores.

In addition, they sweep, scrape, sand, or chip dirt and irregularities to clean base surfaces, correcting imperfections that may show through the covering.

Although specific duties may vary, many of them heat and soften floor covering materials to patch cracks or fit floor coverings around irregular surfaces, using a blowtorch.

To some Floor Layers, it is also their responsibility to layout, position, and apply shock-absorbing, sound-deadening, or decorative coverings to floors, walls, and cabinets, following guidelines to keep courses straight and create designs.

Freedom to make decisions

How much decision making freedom does this job offer?

No freedom
0%

Very little freedom
0%

Limited freedom
16%

Some freedom
29%

A lot of freedom
55%

Structured vs unstructured work

To what extent is this job structured for you versus allowing you to determine your own tasks, priorities, and goals?

No freedom
0%

Very little freedom
16%

Limited freedom
1%

Some freedom
28%

A lot of freedom
55%


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What is the job like

Job satisfaction

Low

Is this job meaningful

Average

63% said they were satisfied with their job and 56% said they found their job meaningful.


Ralph Severson
Flooring Masters

My typical day starts with meeting one of the crews on a new site to speak with the homeowner and lead, help solve any problems, and give everyone a rundown of how this job should be tackled.

After I meet with the crews on new jobs I head into the office. I start the day by answering emails and calling any new leads that we have acquired. After this, I go meet with homeowners and create estimates for their projects. By this time there is usually some reason that I need to visit one of the sites where we are already working to help sort out some sort of unforeseen issue such as subflooring that needs to be replaced. I contact the homeowner to explain the situation, and added cost of replacing it. Then get their blessing on doing so. While I try to keep a tight schedule, no day is typical because I have to prioritize things on the fly as they arise.

The rest of the day is just like managing any other business. You spend your days communicating and coordinating through emails, text, calls, and face-to-face conversations. I am very lucky in that my daughter is a great lead carpenter who can solve any problem on the job. This allows me to focus on growing the business instead of spending my days solving unforeseen issues and putting out fires.

Pros: The biggest pro for this job is seeing a physical result at the end of the project. It gives you a sense of pride that shuffling papers and numbers around doesn’t provide. My favorite pro to this job is I have created a great place to work for several people where they aren’t micromanaged and are treated fairly. Over the years, we’ve trained several people who went on to start their own businesses. I get to make my living helping improve the lives of our employees as well as the homeowners. I get to meet many kind, interesting people. It’s very rewarding.

Cons: The biggest con is that since I am tasked with running the business, I don’t get to put my hands on the projects much at all anymore. Like seeing the physical result of your efforts at the end of the day, working with your hands provides a sense of fulfillment that can’t be matched in any office. Students should keep in mind that there is a shortage of skilled trades today. The world will always need plumbers, electricians, and carpenters. Having a physically active, tactile vocation provides a sense of fulfillment that you just can’t acquire elsewhere.

Another con is when we have an issue arise such as the subflooring I mentioned above, and the homeowner won’t authorize replacing it for one reason or another. I can’t just do shoddy work. On the occasion that something like this happens, we repair it anyway. Shrinks the profit margin, but it’s the right thing to do. Just like in any other business, we sometimes have customers who are unreasonable or make impossible requests. However, since I’ve been doing this for so long I’m pretty skilled at dealing with this sort of thing. Always tell the leads to let me know when this happens so that I can handle it.

Ralph Severson
Flooring Masters


Pros

Suitable for people who like practical and hands-on work.

Suitable for people who want to work in a supportive work environment.

It is easy to get into this career. Some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience is required to get started.

Demand for this career is growing fast.

Cons

Not suitable for people who like to help and teach others.

Salary is below average.

How much do they make

Average salary

$49740 per year

Average hourly wage

$24 per hour

Entry-level Floor Layers with little to no experience can expect to make anywhere between $27,260 to $33,900 per year or $13 to $16 per hour.

Salary range Hourly Annual
Highest (Top 10%) $38 $79,500
Senior (Top 25%) $30 $61,450
Middle (Mid 50%) $22 $45,520
Junior (Bottom 25%) $16 $33,900
No experience (Bottom 10%) $13 $27,260

What is the work day like

Working hours

Less than 40 hours
45%

40 hours
20%

More than 40 hours
35%

Working schedule

30%

70%

0%

Work with group or team

How important is it to work with others in a group or team in this job?

Not important at all
23%

Fairly important
2%

Important
7%

Very important
27%

Extremely important
42%

Deal with external customers

How important is it to work with customers in this job?

Not important at all
1%

Fairly important
28%

Important
40%

Very important
1%

Extremely important
31%

Manage or lead others

How important is it to coordinate or lead others in completing work activities in this job?

Not important at all
2%

Fairly important
1%

Important
55%

Very important
13%

Extremely important
29%

Email

How often do you use email in this job?

Once a week
1%

Every day
0%

Telephone

How often do you have telephone conversations in this job?

Once a week
38%

Every day
40%

Group discussions

How often do you have group discussions in this job?

Once a week
0%

Every day
99%

Public speaking

How often does this job require you to do public speaking?

Never
96%

Once a year
4%

Once a month
0%

Once a week
0%

Every day
0%

Frequency of conflict situations

How often are there conflict situations in this job?

Never
23%

Once a year
70%

Once a month
5%

Once a week
1%

Every day
0%

Dealing with angry people

How often do you have to deal with angry, unpleasant, or discourteous individuals in this job?

Never
0%

Once a year
86%

Once a month
2%

Once a week
12%

Every day
0%

Dealing with physically aggressive people

How often do you have to deal with physically aggressive people in this job?

Never
99%

Once a year
1%

Once a month
0%

Once a week
0%

Every day
0%

Level of competition

How much competitive pressure is in this job?

Not competitive at all
32%

Slightly competitive
24%

Moderately competitive
40%

Highly competitive
1%

Extremely competitive
4%

Repetition in this job

How important is repeating the same type of task over and over in this job?

Not important at all
41%

Fairly important
25%

Important
15%

Very Important
3%

Extremely Important
16%

Impact of decisions on co-workers or company results

What results do your decisions usually have on other people or the reputation or financial resources of your employer?

No impact
0%

Minor impact
0%

Moderate impact
17%

Important impact
30%

Very important impact
53%

Frequency of decision making

How frequently do you have to make decisions that affect other people, the financial resources, and/or the reputation of the company?

Never
0%

Once a year
32%

Once a month
3%

Once a week
12%

Every day
53%

Responsibility for others’ health and safety

How much responsibility is there for the health and safety of others in this job?

No responsibility
24%

Limited responsibility
2%

Moderate responsibility
41%

High responsibility
17%

Very high responsibility
16%

Responsibility for outcomes and results

How much responsibility is there for the work outcomes and results of other workers?

No responsibility
2%

Limited responsibility
16%

Moderate responsibility
16%

High responsibility
24%

Very high responsibility
42%

What is the work environment like

Office-style environment

Indoors in an environmentally controlled condition

Never
1%

Once a year or more
1%

Once a month or more
39%

Once a week or more
32%

Every day
27%

Warehouse-style environment

Indoors in a non-controlled environmental condition such as a warehouse

Never
0%

Once a year or more
23%

Once a month or more
27%

Once a week or more
49%

Every day
1%

Outdoors

Outdoors exposed to all weather conditions

Never
42%

Once a year or more
44%

Once a month or more
11%

Once a week or more
2%

Every day
1%

Outdoors – Under Cover

Outdoors but under cover (e.g. structure with roof but no walls)

Never
64%

Once a year or more
26%

Once a month or more
11%

Once a week or more
0%

Every day
0%

How to become one

Difficulty to become one

Easy
You may need some previous work-related skill, knowledge, or experience. Most careers in this difficulty category usually don’t require a degree. However, you will need a few months of on-the-job training with experienced employees. Similar careers include Customer Service Representatives, Security Guards, and Bank Tellers.

Required level of education

What level of education do you need to perform the job?

Less than a High School Diploma
6%

High School Diploma or equivalent
90%

Post-Secondary Certificate
4%

Some College Courses
0%

Associate’s Degree or similar
0%

Bachelor’s Degree
0%

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate
0%

Master’s Degree
0%

Post-Master’s Certificate
0%

First Professional Degree
0%

Doctoral Degree
0%

Post-Doctoral Training
0%

Relevant work experience

How much related work experience do you need to get hired for the job?

None
52%

1 month
0%

1 to 3 months
0%

3 to 6 months
1%

6 months to 1 year
0%

1 to 2 years
29%

2 to 4 years
1%

4 to 6 years
14%

6 to 8 years
0%

8 to 10 years
4%

Over 10 years
0%

On The Job Training

How much on the job training do you need to perform the job?

None or short demonstration
0%

1 month
1%

1 to 3 months
15%

3 to 6 months
2%

6 months to 1 year
0%

1 to 2 years
6%

2 to 4 years
65%

4 to 10 years
11%

Over 10 years
0%

Should you become one

Best personality for this career
The Builder

People with this personality type likes practical and hands-on work. They prefer working with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery.

100%

43%

33%

14%

19%

76%

You can read more about these career personality types here.

People who are suitable for this job tend to like work activities that include practical, hands-on problems and solutions. They like working with plants, animals, and real-world materials like wood, tools, and machinery.

They also like following set procedures and routines. They like working with data and details more than with ideas.

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