A Day In The Life of Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators

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In this day in the life guide, you will find out:

  • What does a day as Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators looks like
  • What do they do every day
  • Things they do on a weekly or monthly basis
  • How many hours do they work

The purpose of this is to give you a clear picture of this career so you can make a better career decision on whether this career is suitable for you or not.

Top 2 Featured Schools For Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators

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Typical Day for Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators

Here is a list of tasks that Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators do every day.

  • Observe leveling indicator arms to verify levelness and alignment of tracks.
  • Operate single- or multiple-head spike driving machines to drive spikes into ties and secure rails.
  • Lubricate machines, change oil, or fill hydraulic reservoirs to specified levels.

Weekly and Monthly Tasks

Here is a list of tasks that Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators do on a weekly or monthly basis.

  • Patrol assigned track sections so that damaged or broken track can be located and reported.
  • Repair or adjust track switches, using wrenches and replacement parts.
  • Operate track-wrench machines to tighten or loosen bolts at joints that hold ends of rails together.
  • Cut rails to specified lengths, using rail saws.
  • Drill holes through rails, tie plates, or fishplates for insertion of bolts or spikes, using power drills.

Working Hours

  • How many hours do Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators work per week? 40 hours per week
  • What is the work schedule like? Regular (Set schedule and routine)

Work Environment

Outdoors, Exposed to Weather
In an Enclosed Vehicle or Equipment
Sounds, Noise Levels Are Distracting or Uncomfortable
Very Hot or Cold Temperatures
Extremely Bright or Inadequate Lighting
Exposed to Contaminants
Exposed to Hazardous Equipment
Exposed to Minor Burns, Cuts, Bites, or Stings
Wear Common Protective or Safety Equipment such as Safety Shoes, Glasses, Gloves, Hearing Protection, Hard Hats, or Life Jackets

Learn more about Rail-Track Laying and Maintenance Equipment Operators

Overview | Job Description | Salary | Requirements | Is This Career Right For Me

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This career is also closely related to Ballast Cleaning Machine Operator, Emergency Service Restorer, Machine Operator, Oil Distributor Tender, Operator, Portable Grinding Machine Operator, Rail Maintenance Worker, Rail Track Layer, Rail Track Maintainer or Railroad Track Mechanic.

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